TPWD District Fisheries Office

8684 LaVillage Avenue
Waco, Texas 76712
(254) 666-5190
John Tibbs, Biologist

About the Area

Nearby State Parks:

 

Aquilla Lake

Quick Links: Fishing Regulations | Angling Opportunities | Cover & Structure | Tips & Tactics


Lake Characteristics

Location: 35 miles north of Waco off Highway 310, just west of I-35 near Hillsboro
Surface area: 3,020 acres
Maximum depth: 59.5 feet
Impounded: 1982

Water Conditions

Current Lake Level
Conservation Pool Elevation: 537.5 ft. msl
Fluctuation: 3-4 feet
Normal Clarity: Stained

Reservoir Controlling Authority

US Army Corps of Engineers
285 CR 3602
Clifton, Texas 76634
(254) 694-3189

Aquatic Vegetation

Limited amounts of pondweed and water willow

Predominant Fish Species

Lake Records
Stocking History
Latest Survey Report

Lake Maps

Contact local tackle shops

Fishing Regulations

All fishes are managed under statewide regulations.

Angling Opportunities
Species Poor Fair Good Excellent
Largemouth Bass   yes    
Catfish     yes  
Crappie     yes  
White Bass   yes    
Sunfish   yes    
Fishing Cover/Structure

Both the Hackberry and Aquilla Creek arms are loaded with standing timber and brush, but they are shallow in most areas and provide little fish habitat. The main pool close to the dam is mostly devoid of timber. A word of caution: when navigating up the creek arms of the lake, watch for large tree stumps just under the water!

Tips & Tactics

Largemouth bass fishing can be good on Aquilla. The combination of stained water, localized cover, and light fishing pressure means there are some big bass to catch but you have to work for them. Fish spinner baits, jig and pork combos, and plastic worms in and around cover. Tree lines, fencerows, and creek channels are good places to start. Crappie are usually found on submerged brushpiles and large isolated trees. Live minnows seem to be the preferred bait. Channel and blue catfish are caught drift fishing flats or on trotlines set around shallow, brushy areas. Shad, cutbait, or bloodbait will all work. White bass are caught trolling small tailspinners, jigs, and spoons across windy flats.


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