Horned Lizard License Plate Grants: SGCN Research Priorities


Silveus’ dropseed prairie surveys
In 2013, Wildlife Diversity program funded modelling potential habitat of globally rare Silveus’ dropseed prairies in Northeast Texas. We are seeking proposals to confirm presence/absence of Silveus’ dropseed prairies, develop relationships with the landowners in assistance with our district biologists, document current prairie condition and floral diversity.

Weches prairies and glades surveys
Develop relationships with landowners in San Augustine and Sabine County, Texas that contain known and potential Weches prairies and glades. Document the flora and rank condition of Weches prairies and glades.

Surveys for Texas screwstem and rough-stemmed aster
Conduct rare plant surveys for Texas screwstem (Bartonia paniculata subsp. texana) in southeast Texas and rough-stemmed aster (Symphyotrichum puniceum var. scabricaule) in northeast Texas. This would include producing element occurrence record updates and new records for each occurrence visited and submitted to the Texas Natural Diversity Database.

Surveys for Tharp's blue-star, Big Bend broom, Guadalupe Fescue, and big red sage
Conduct rare plant surveys for Tharp’s blue-star (Amsonia tharpii), Big Bend broom (Genistidium dumosum), and Guadalupe Mountains fescue (Festuca ligulata) in western Texas and big red sage (Salvia pentstemonoides) in central Texas. This would include producing element occurrence record updates and new records for each occurrence visited and submitted to the Texas Natural Diversity Database.

Systematics of the amphipod genus Stygobromus
The genus Stygobromus includes over a dozen Texas species, including the federally endangered S. pecki and several undescribed species. Many of these species have highly restricted ranges and are sensitive to changes in groundwater quality and quantity. However, conservation of these species is hindered by taxonomic uncertainty, and combined molecular and morphologic approaches are needed to clarify species boundaries.

Distribution and conservation status for rare Odonates
Odonates serve as important components of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem, and facilitate nutrient transfer across the terrestrial-aquatic boundary. Despite their importance, little is known about the distribution and life history of several, odonates in Texas. Consequently, basic ecological research is needed to facilitate effective conservation status assessment and management of Texas odonates.



Back to Top
Back to Top