State Wildlife Grants: Invertebrate Funding Priorities


Field Surveys and Habitat Assessments for Bee Species of Greatest Conservation Need
Nearly 20 bee species are listed as Species of Greatest Conservation Need in the current Texas Conservation Action Plan. Very little is known regading their current distribution, foraging ecology, and habitat use. Robust historical locality is available for some taxa, Bombus species most notably. Surveys that revisit historical collection localities to assess species persistence are sorely needed to address signigicant data gaps.
  • Characterize, identify, and survey potential habitat as well as previously known sites.
  • Collect site and population information using Texas Natural Diversity Database (TXNDD) forms.
  • Submit report on status and threat updates, TXNDD forms, and GIS data/shapefiles.
Field Surveys and Habitat Assessments for Invertebrates Petitioned for Federal Listing
The Kistachie painted crayfish (Orconectes maletae), Louisiana eyed silk moth (Automeris louisiana), and Texas emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora margarita) have been petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act. These species are all marked by significant data gaps regarding distribution and/or habitat use. Field surveys and assessments of current threats are currently needed to determine these species conservation status in Texas.
  • Characterize, identify, and survey potential habitat as well as previously known sites.
  • Collect site and population information using TXNDD forms.
  • Submit report on status and threat updates, TXNDD forms, and GIS data/shapefiles.
Field Surveys and Habitat Assessments for Endemic Insects of the Monahans Dune System
Several insect species have been recorded as endemic to the Monahans Dune System of west Texas. These species (Anomala suavis, Epitragosoma arenari, Nicagus occultus, Polyphylla monahansensis, Polyphylla pottsorum, Prionus arenarius, Prionus spinnipenis, Stenopelmatus monahansensis, and Trigonoscutoides texanus) current distributions are not well-defined and little, to any, up-to-date information is available regarding habitat use. Given lack of current data, all of the aforementioned species are considered extremely rare and appear to be highly localized within this dune system. Field surveys and assessments of current threats are currently needed to determine these species conservation status in Texas.
  • Characterize, identify, and survey potential habitat as well as previously known sites.
  • Collect site and population information using TXNDD forms.
  • Submit report on status and threat updates, TXNDD forms, and GIS data/shapefiles.
Identification, Foraging Ecology, and Habitat Requirements of Effective Pollinators of Rare and Endangered Plants
Most flowering plants require insect pollination to produce viable fruits and seeds. Without such insects, many plants would eventually go extinct and their insect pollinators might suffer the same fate as well. Although floral visitors of many plants are known, the visitors that truly deliver pollination are not. This is of particular importance for rare and endangered plants as it affects the viability and long-term maintenance of their populations. It is also vital to know the habitat requirements of the true pollinators in order to also provide for their long-term sustainability.
  • Identify the effective pollinators of rare and endangered plants listed as Species of Greatest Conservation Need on the current Texas Conservation Action Plan.
  • Determine the pollinators foraging ecology and habitat requirements.
  • Collect site and population information for both the pollinators and the plants using Texas Natural Diversity Database (TXNDD) forms.
  • Submit report on effective pollinator identities, foraging ecology, and habitat requirements as well as TXNDD forms and GIS data/shapefiles for effective pollinators and SGCN plants.
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