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Texas Coastal Habitats

small texas with gulf coast highlighted Scenes from the video:
Ann Miller and Bryan Adams talk about the shore and what's under the gulf waters. Ann Miller and Bryan Adams talk about plants on the Texas coast
Ann Miller and Bryan Adams, USFWS specialist, talk about the nature of the gulf coast. Do you know what's on the bottom of the gulf? Listen and find out!
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(This video clip continues on the "Texas Mid-Coast National Wildlife Refuges" page.)

Texas bays and Gulf waters are home to thousands of fish, shellfish, birds and other animals, all of which depend on the coast's diverse habitats for food and shelter. Humans, too, share the coast, building homes and ports, harvesting seafood and enjoying the many kinds of recreation the coast has to offer.


The Gulf Coast is a nearly level slowly drained plain, dissected by streams and rivers flowing into the Gulf of Mexico. The region includes barrier islands along the coast, salt grass marshes surrounding bays and estuaries, remnant tallgrass prairies, oak parklands and oak mottes scattered along the coast, and tall woodlands in the river bottomlands. Soils are acidic sands and sandy loams, with clays occurring primarily in the river bottoms.


The upper Texas coast has rich woods and swamps. True swamps are found mostly in East Texas, from Houston east to the Sabine River.


Traveling south from the upper toward the mid-coast is the popular Galveston Bay, near Houston.


Corpus Bay is the mid coast region has bays and estuaries that support many fish. This is a very popular area to see birds and to fish from jetties.


South Texas has seagrasses in Aransas Bay.


Along the mid and south coast, Mustang Island and Padre Island parks are known for wonderful beaches and seashells.


Texas coastal parks are also known for their beautiful skies.

(This video clip continues on the "Texas Mid-Coast National Wildlife Refuges" page.)


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