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|  TPWD News Releases About Hunting Dated 2012-08-08                      |
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[ Note: This item is more than two years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: Mike Cox, 512-389-8046, mike.cox@tpwd.texas.gov ]
Aug. 8, 2012
Game Warden Field Notes
The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.
--Oops, We Did It Again A Red River County game Warden and two Bowie County game wardens received information about a possible road hunting incident near a residence. The property owner and his wife were outside at the time and after hearing shots, the husband, who had been drinking, jumped into his vehicle and began to chase the hunters. While in pursuit, in an attempt to stop the hunters the man began shooting a pistol out of his window. The man rammed the hunters' vehicle and in the process flipped his vehicle over and suffered serious injuries. The hunters had called 911 to report they were being shot at. When wardens contacted the suspected road hunters, they denied having weapons and shooting at anything. Unaware that their 911 call had not been dropped as they believed, in the background officials could clearly hear someone say, "hide the gun in them woods," and "not that far, we're gonna come back and get it tonight." After hearing the 911 tape, the three hunters gave statements admitting to shooting at multiple animals from the road that day as well as committing multiple burglaries of habitations and storage buildings in the Dekalb area. Wardens also interviewed the hunters about a year-long investigation regarding the slaying of an 8-point buck last August in Red River County. The hunters admitted to being on the ranch illegally and shooting the buck leaving it to waste. A total of 24 cases were filed on the three individuals. Meanwhile, the overzealous property owner was filed on for DWI and deadly conduct.
--MisguidedLlano County game warden and a Lampasas County game warden were patrolling Lake LBJ when they stopped a fishing guide. The guide has been known to keep undersized fish in the past, and after a quick water safety inspection the wardens inspected an ice chest full of fish which included some that were undersized. The wardens took the guide and fish onto their boat and measured all the fish. They found eight undersized crappie and one undersized black bass. Citations were issued and all the fish were seized.
--Photo FinishA Guadalupe County game warden was called out at around 10 p.m. for a boat wreck/hit-and-run on Lake Dunlap. Comal County wardens got the original call and called Guadalupe County for assistance. It was reported that around dark, a ski boat ran over the front of a kayak. Fortunately, the man on the kayak suffered only minor injuries and the impact put both boats against the bank in some trees. The kayaker attempted to get the ski boat operator's identification and insurance information and had no luck. The kayaker was holding on to the ski boat as he tried to reason with the driver. The ski boat driver took a swing at the kayaker who then took a picture of the operator and the Texas boat registration number with his iPhone. The ski boat operator then sped off dragging the kayaker more than 100 yards before he let go. A Comal County game warden ran the TX number and it came back to a resident on the lake. The game warden provided the Guadalupe County game warden with the information and he went to the residence. After a brief interview, the ski boat operator was placed under arrest for assault causing bodily injury. Other charges may follow pending further investigation. The ski boat did have transfer marks from hitting the kayak.
--Drive-up ServiceA Polk County game warden was checking boat ramps on Lake Livingston when he saw someone motor his pontoon boat up to a local boat ramp at a high rate of speed. The warden watched as the subject got out of his boat and staggered up through the parking lot to retrieve his truck. The warden stopped the subject and conducted standard field sobriety tests. The subject failed the test and was placed under arrest for BWI.
--Falling Beer Can Leads to ArrestTwo Comal County game wardens were working water safety enforcement on Canyon Lake when they saw a man who was not wearing a life jacket while he was operating his personal watercraft inside the no wake area near a boat ramp. As the wardens approached they observed a can of beer fall from the PWC into the water. During a water safety inspection, the game wardens located two more empty beer cans. Due to the man's confused demeanor, slurred speech, and the strong odor of alcohol on his breath, the game wardens decided to conduct sobriety tests on him. The operator was arrested for boating while intoxicated and was booked in the Comal County Jail.
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[ Note: This item is more than two years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: Steve Lightfoot, 512-389-4701, steve.lightfoot@tpwd.texas.gov ] [SL]
Aug. 8, 2012
Hunting, Fishing Licenses on sale Aug. 15
AUSTIN -- Current year Texas hunting and fishing licenses (except year-to-date fishing licenses) expire Aug. 31, and new licenses for 2012-2013 will go on sale Wednesday, Aug. 15.
The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department issues about 2.1 million hunting and fishing licenses annually through the agency's 28 field offices, more than 58 state parks and at over 1,600 retailers across Texas. Licenses may also be purchased online through the TPWD Web site at www.tpwd.state.tx.us/buy or by phone (800-895-4248) with a $5 convenience fee required for each transaction , Call center hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday -- Friday. The online transaction system is available 24/7. A transaction receipt may be printed at the time of purchase for online and a confirmation number is provided for phone orders, and the physical license is mailed separately. Confirmation numbers will verify that a license has been purchased, which is sufficient for dove hunting, but will not allow hunters to take fish or wildlife that require a tag.
Dove Hunting Requirements
In addition to a hunting license, all wing shooters will need to purchase a game bird stamp. To hunt dove or teal in September, a Migratory Game Bird Stamp ($7) is required. Duck hunters also need to purchase a Federal Duck Stamp and receive HIP (Harvest Information Program) certification. HIP certification involves a brief survey of previous year's hunting success and is conducted at the time licenses are purchased. Certification will be printed on the license. Lifetime license holders must also be HIP-certified and purchase the Federal Duck Stamp to hunt migratory birds. All other state stamp endorsements are included with a lifetime license.
There are other mandatory endorsements to consider at the time of purchase, too. An Upland Game Bird Stamp ($7) is required to hunt all non-migratory game birds, including turkey, quail, pheasant and chachalaca.
Of course, anyone who purchases the Super Combo license package, the best bang for the buck at $68, automatically gets these needed stamps. Sportsmen ages 65 and older qualify for a discounted Senior Super Combo for $32. Duck hunters will still need to purchase a Federal Duck Stamp.
Big Time Texas Hunts
Also available everywhere licenses are sold are chances for Big Time Texas Hunts. The Big Time Texas Hunts is a very popular Department program that offers hunters the opportunity to enter to win one or more premium guided hunts with food and lodging provided, as well as taxidermy in some cases. The crown jewel of the program is the Texas Grand Slam dream hunt package, which includes four separate hunts for Texas' most prized big game animals -- the desert bighorn sheep, white-tailed deer, mule deer and pronghorn. There are several quality whitetail hunt packages available, as well as opportunities to pursue alligator , waterfowl, upland game birds, and exotics such as sable and gemsbok
Hunters can buy Big Time Texas Hunts entries online for just $9 each at www.tpwd.state.tx.us/buyentry , or for $10 each at license retailers or by phone. There is no limit to the number of entries an individual may purchase and all proceeds benefit conservation, wildlife management and public hunting. The program ismade possible with support from Toyota, Dallas Safari Club, Texas Trophy Hunters Association and the Texas Bighorn Society. More details on all seven premium hunts can be found online.
Lifetime License Drawing
Hunters and anglers can also take care of their licensing requirements for life with the purchase of an $1,800 Lifetime Super Combo, or you can enter for a chance at winning a lifetime license through a special drawing. Entries for the Lifetime License Drawing cost $5 each and may be purchased wherever licenses are sold. There is no limit on the number of entries that may be purchased. Winners will be drawn on Dec. 30, 2012 and June 30, 2013. If you enter by Dec. 27, 2012, you will be eligible for both drawings.
Mandatory Hunter Education Certification
Hunter Education Certification is also required of any hunter born on or after Sept. 2, 1971 and who is at least 17 years old. For hunters who are unable to work in a hunter education course before hunting season for whatever reason, TPWD does offer a deferral option that allows people 17 years of age or older a one-time only extension to complete the state's hunter education requirements. The individual must first purchase a hunting license and then may purchase the deferral option #166.
Hunters using the deferral must be accompanied by someone 17 years old or older also licensed to hunt in Texas. The accompanying individual must have completed hunter education or be exempt from the requirements (born before Sept. 2, 1971). The extension is good for one license year, by which time the person with the deferred option needs to complete a hunter education course.
This option is not available to those who have ever received a conviction or deferred adjudication for lack of hunter education certification. They still must take the course before going afield.
For information concerning the latest regulations and articles on hunting and fishing in Texas, check out the 2012-2013 Outdoor Annual available at license retailers and online at www.txoutdoorannual.com. The Outdoor Annualcan also be downloaded as a PDF.
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