State Wildlife Grants: Mammal Funding Priorities


Bats and White Nose Syndrome
For all native bat species, with emphasis on those potentially affected by White Nose Syndrome (Myotis lucifugus, Perimyotis subflavus, Eptesicus fuscus, Myotis sodalis, Myotis velifer, Myotis austroriparius, and potentially other cave-hibernating colony bats like Tadarida brasiliensis) and employing the USFWS decontamination protocols for cave surveys of any kind:
  • With findings, provide an assessment and description of the distribution and population status.
  • Update or conduct new surveys/monitoring in key portions of the state in natural habitats (e.g. observations in roosts, colonies; not bridges or mist-netting over roadside bar ditches), coordinating with Bat Conservation International to target appropriate areas.
  • Collate and/or collect bat-occupied cave/karst hibernacula environmental (temperature, humidity, other microclimate) baseline and trend data related to where bats roost in the site.
  • Sample known occupied hibernacula caves to test for Geomyces destructans working with a certified laboratory for that analysis.
Northern Rock Mouse
The Northern Rock Mouse (Peromyscus nasutus) is found in the high elevations of western Texas. This species is historically rare and little is known regarding its current status.
  • Document the current distribution of P. nasutus in West Texas through field surveys and trapping.
  • Conduct genetic analyses to determine population status.
  • Collect site and population information using Texas Natural Diversity Database (TXNDD) forms.
  • Submit report on status and threat updates, TXNDD forms, and GIS data/shapefiles.
  • Provide conservation recommendations and a proposal for monitoring to assess trend in the future, if warranted by findings.
Pecos River Muskrat
The Pecos River muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus ripensis) historically occurred throughout western Texas. The last surveys for this species were conducted in 1981 and it was found it to be rare and possibly declining. It's current distribution and status is unknown.
  • Document the current distribution of the Pecos River muskrat in western Texas through sign surveys and live trapping.
  • Conduct genetic analyses on captured and museum specimens to determine the level of relatedness to other populations of Ondatra.
  • Identify key habitat requirements to assist in future restoration efforts if needed.
  • Collect site and population information using TXNDD forms.
  • Submit report on status and threat updates, TXNDD forms, and GIS data/shapefiles.
  • Provide conservation recommendations and a proposal for monitoring to assess trend in the future, if warranted by findings.
Texas Kangaroo Rat
The Texas kangaroo rat is a state-threatened species that is geographically limited to a few counties in northern Texas and only occurs in specific habitats (heavily grazed, short grass habitats with clay soils and scattered mesquite). Field surveys and assessments of current threats are currently needed to determine this species conservation status in Texas.
  • Develop population modeling proposal to identify potential occupied habitat.
  • Study effects of habitat modification (CRP, agriculture conversion, etc) on local populations.
  • Continue previous mark/recapture research to develop trend data on known populations.
  • Collect site and population information using TXNDD forms.
  • Submit report on status and threat updates, TXNDD forms, and GIS data/shapefiles.
  • Provide conservation recommendations and a proposal for monitoring to assess trend in the future, if warranted by findings.
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