Regulations Committee

Wednesday, 9:00 a.m., Jan. 20, 1999

Commission Hearing Room
4200 Smith School Road
Austin, TX 78744
Item
No.
Subject Public Hearing
Agenda Item No.
  Approval of the Committee Minutes from the previous meeting.  
  Summary of Minutes  
1. Chairman's Charges (Oral Presentation) Committee Only
2. Joint Commission Workshop (TPWD, TNRCC, and TWDB)
   A. Update on S.B. 1
   B. Legislative Issues
Staff: Larry McKinney
Committee Only
3. 1999-2000 Statewide Hunting and Fishing Proclamation
Staff: Gary Graham, Phil Durocher, Hal Osburn
Committee Only
4. Rulemaking Petition – Crappie Population at Joe Pool Lake
Staff: Ken Kurzawski
6
5. Public Lands Proclamation and Candidates State Parks for Public Hunts
Staff: Herb Kothmann
Committee Only
6. Status of Eastern Turkey Restoration Program
Staff: Dr. Jerry Cooke
Committee Only
7. Other Business  

Summary of Minutes
Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission
Regulations Committee
November 4, 1998

BE IT REMEMBERED that heretofore on the 4th day of November 1998, there came to be heard matters under the regulatory authority of the Parks and Wildlife Commission of Texas, in the Commission hearing room of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Headquarters complex, Austin, Travis County, Texas beginning at 2:18 p.m., to wit:

I. COMMISSION ATTENDANCE

Lee Bass, Chair
Nolan Ryan
Richard Heath
Mickey Burleson
Carol Dinkins
John Avila, Jr.
Ernest Angelo
II. OPENING STATEMENT:

Mr. Andrew Sansom, Executive Director, read the opening statement into the record.

III. APPROVAL OF MINUTES:

Chairman Bass began the proceedings by entertaining a motion by Commissioner Heath to approve the minutes of the August 26, 1998 meeting of the Regulations Committee. The motion was seconded by Commissioner Ryan and passed unanimously. Chairman Bass recognized Executive Director Andrew Sansom, who had briefed the Committee on the Chairman=s Charges.

2. ACTION - Migratory Game Bird Proclamation

Presenters - Gary Graham, Vernon Bevill, and Dr. Bruce Batt

Chair modified the agenda to begin the meeting's presentations with Item 7, Migratory Game Bird Proclamation. Chair recognized Dr. Gary Graham, Director Wildlife Division who introduced Vernon Bevill, Migratory Wildlife Program Director. Mr. Bevill introduced Dr. Bruce Batt of Ducks Unlimited who presented a slide show reviewing the overabundance issue regarding snow geese. Following Dr. Batt=s presentation, Chairman Bass asked how long snow geese lived. Dr. Batt responded that the longest one on record was 23 years, but they live an average of 8. They breed successfully an average of 4 times during their lifetime. Commissioner Heath asked what the depth of the salinity was in the tundra area. Dr. Batt related that it was just on the surface. Commissioner Heath followed asking what salinities were 2 feet below the surface. Dr. Batt said there would be less saline conditions. Chairman Bass asked what Dr. Batt viewed as a sustainable population given the current state of the habitat. Dr. Batt estimated about 1 million birds. Chairman Bass asked if the population was still growing given these conditions. Dr. Batt indicated it was. Chairman Bass requested Dr. Batt review the collateral damage and effect on other species. Dr. Batt mentioned that the sandpipers, plovers, invertebrates, and ducks nesting within the marsh would be impacted but that these birds would not go extinct. Chairman Bass stated that if, under a worst-case scenario, the snow goose population crashed or declined than the other species would not be brought down with them. Dr. Batt indicated they would not, but would be severely impacted. Chairman Bass asked what Canada=s view of this situation was. Dr. Batt indicated in was parallel with USFWS views. Commissioner Angelo asked if Canadian geese have a similar problem. Dr. Batt stated that that species does contribute to the problem, but their total numbers are less, and they nest singly rather than in colonies as do the snow geese.

Vernon Bevill then presented possible Migratory Regulatory changes. These potential changes included: 1) changing mourning dove from a 12-bird bag/70-day season to a 15-bird bag and a 60-day season; 2) maintaining a 16-day teal season provided the population index remains above the North American waterfowl management goal; 3) the possibility of adjusting

2. BRIEFING - FY 98-99 Statewide Hunting and Fishing Proclamation

Presenters - Larry McKinney, Phil Durocher, Ken Kurzawski, Hal Osburn, Gary Graham and Jerry Cooke

INLAND FISHERIES

Chairman Bass called for the second item of business, a briefing on changes being considered for the statewide hunting and fishing proclamation. Phil Durocher, Director of the Inland Fisheries Division, presented potential freshwater proposals. This year's changes focus on four areas; simplification; increased opportunity; endangered species; and clarification. In the area of simplification, staff is constantly evaluating our existing regulations. We have identified some areas where we instituted specialized regulations that have not brought about the desired results. We propose to change these regulations back to the statewide standards. The first group of reservoirs is Brownwood, Champion Creek, and Coleman. These reservoirs currently have a 16-inch minimum length limit and five fish daily bag for largemouth bass. The proposal would change these regulations back to the statewide standard, a 14-inch minimum length limit and five fish daily bag. Next, the current 14-18 inch slot length limit on Lakes Bridgeport, Georgetown, Striker, Tyler State Park, and Weatherford would be changed back to the statewide standards for largemouth bass. An experimental 18-inch minimum length limit for blue catfish was put on two reservoirs, Fort Phantom Hill and E. V. Spence. We have evaluated these populations for 5 years and have not seen any improvements in the quality of angling. Therefore, we wish to change the limits back to a 12-inch minimum length and 25 fish daily bag limits that are the statewide standards for blue and channel catfish. Our next area is increasing angling opportunity. We wish to make a minor change to the minimum length of bass that can be weighed at lakeside weigh stations at three of our catch and release lakes, Purtis Creek, Raven, and Gibbons Creek. That length would be changed from 22 to 21 inches and will allow more anglers to weigh bass. Also, we propose to change the limit at Lake Murval in Panola County from a 14-inch minimum length limit to a 14-21 inch slot. This reservoir has shown some potential to produce trophy bass. Staff is concerned about a build-up of smaller bass partially due to increased hydrilla abundance, which has increased the production of bass. A slot would allow some of these small bass to be harvested and should result in improved growth of larger bass. One concern is impact on tournaments. Lake Murval has some tournaments although it is not that large, about 3,800 acres. We plan to go to that area to gather public input prior to the January meeting. Finally in this area, we propose to change the statewide limits for walleye from a 16-inch minimum length limit and 5 fish daily bag to no minimum length limit and a bag of 5 fish with only two allowed to be under 16 inches. This change is primarily in response to an effort to improve the quality of walleye angling in Lake Meredith, which is the primary walleye fishery in Texas. Another area of possible change addresses concern over the Pecos pupfish. This species is native to the Trans-Pecos and is threatened by non-native fish introduced as bait, especially by hybridization with sheepshead minnow. TPW has entered into a conservation agreement with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the State of New Mexico to limit the use of bait fish to those currently found in the Trans-Pecos that do not pose a threat to the pupfish. This action should prevent the need for listing the Pecos pupfish as endangered. Finally, a clarification is needed to aid enforcement of the regulations pertaining to taking of fish underwater. Language specifically prohibiting the use of pole and line underwater was deleted during sunset and needs to be reinstated. Chairman Bass inquired whether it is legal to spear fish. Mr. Durocher responded it is legal only for non-game fish, which excludes catfish. Chairman Bass also asked how widespread is this activity. Mr. Durocher said it is more widespread than originally thought, and there is concern over these people targeting large catfish, especially flatheads, which are a valuable resource. Law Enforcement Director Robertson noted other states are also addressing this issue. Mr. Durocher commented that staff plans to focus efforts to obtain public comment on those changes we anticipate will generate the most interest. Commissioner Clymer asked for clarification on the change to the catch and release regulations and Mr. Durocher provided that.

COASTAL FISHERIES

Chair recognized Hal Osburn, Director Coastal Fisheries Division. Mr. Osburn presented potential regulation changes regarding consistency with federal waters in the Gulf of Mexico on King Mackerel size limits. Pending the scoping process, staff would consider the possibility of increasing size limits of king mackerel from 23 inches to 27 inches.

WILDLIFE

Chair recognized Dr. Gary Graham, Division Director Wildlife who introduced Dr. Jerry Cooke, Director for Upland Ecology. Dr. Cooke presented possible wildlife regulations including: 1) including Fannin, Polk, San Jacinto, Tyler and Grayson counties in the eastern wild turkey spring season; chairman Bass asked about impact of the hunting season on the population. Dr. Cooke responded he believed no banded bird had been taken yet. Chairman Bass asked if check stations were still being implemented. Dr. Cooke responded affirmatively. Chairman Bass asked what the harvest had been. Dr. Cooke responded he did not have those figures with him but that he would provide them to the Commission. Dr. Cooke continued 2) changes from 9 doe days to a full season in Archer, Baylor, Clay, Montague, and Wise counties, either sex; in 37 Panhandle counties to go from 6 doe days to 16 doe days; 3) to add a weekend youth-only season the weekend before the regular opening of squirrel season. Dr. Cooke then presented proposals taken from the public. These included: 1) Washington County Wildlife Association recommended redefinition of a buck deer as is used by 289 members of the association, covering over 30,000 acres. Chairman Bass asked what proportion of the deer habitat in the county the 30,000 acres would represent. Dr. Cooke responded it would be a substantial fraction; 2) The Texas Sportsmen Association also looked at redefining buck deer; 3) The Doss Wildlife Management Association proposes to shift deer season to 2 weeks later in Gillespie County; 4) the Lone Star Hunters Association and the Texas Archer Retailers and Manufacturers Association believe a new device designed to lock a bow into a partial or full-drawn condition in effect converts a long bow into a crossbow and recommend the definition of a long bow or crossbow return to its original definition. Dr. Cooke indicated that staff felt this was not a resource issue but a matter of aesthetics among archers. Chairman Bass asked if this device would be prohibited during regular archery only season. Dr. Cooke related that it would be legal, however, during a general season and for those individuals with upper-limb handicaps. 5) A proposal from Mr. Hershel Ivy to change muzzleloader season to where it would extend one week before and one week after the general season. Dr. Cooke related that staff believed this proposal would potentially increase harvest pressure on antlerless deer where no such increase would be recommended by staff. Dr. Cooke then concluded the presentation. Chairman Bass asked for questions. There were none. Chairman Bass concluded the briefing on the Statewide Hunting and Fishing Proclamation.

3. ACTION - Briefing on Deer Management Update

Presenters - Dr. Gary Graham and Dr. Jerry Cooke

Chairman recognized Dr. Gary Graham, Director Wildlife Division who introduced Dr. Jerry Cooke. Dr. Cooke, Program Director for Upland Ecology reviewed deer management programs in the State. Dr. Cooke began by providing an overview of the various deer management programs available to private landowners, and explained the department's rationale with respect to the central role of wildlife management plans in sound biological practice. Dr. Cooke then addressed landowner participation in the Managed Lands Deer permit program, noting the annual increase in private acreage under wildlife management plans in most areas of the state. Dr. Cooke also informed the committee that to date there had been two applications for the Deer Management Permit, with one being approved. Dr. Cooke continued by giving the committee a brief historical overview of deer-restoration efforts in the state and the events which resulted in creation of permits for the Trapping, Transporting, and Transplanting of game animals and game birds (Triple T permits). He then apprized the committee of the popularity of the permits and the department's concerns that the permits were in some cases being used to create put-and-take hunting and de facto sale of deer. Dr. Cooke outlined the department's efforts over the previous year to develop public support and consensus for modifications to the regulations. The department's goal, Dr. Cooke reiterated, has been to use the wildlife management plan to ensure that the habitat supporting all wildlife is not adversely impacted by unnaturally high numbers of deer. Dr. Cooke then stated that although new regulations for the permit system had been drafted, staff believed that the existing regulations were sufficient, provided the Commission concurred that staff's intentions were consistent with Commission policy to date. Chairman Bass asked if he was correct in understanding that staff envisioned the wildlife management plan as the major determinant in permit issuance. Dr. Cooke replied in the affirmative. Chairman Bass and Dr. Cooke then discussed the role of trap sites and release sites in current activities. Chairman Bass then asked as to exactly how the wildlife management plans would be used to prevent abuses. Dr. Cooke explained that abuses could not be eliminated, but could be substantially reduced by using the management plan strictly for biologically justifiable purposes. Chairman Bass then asked if the department had the statutory authority to examine records relating to Triple T activities in order to determine if the sale of deer was being hidden in the expenses associated with permitted actions. Jim Robertson, Law Enforcement Division Director, and Chairman Bass then discussed some hypothetical scenarios, with Mr. Robertson acknowledging that the department enjoyed the authority to require applicants to furnish the information necessary to establish an audit trail. Commissioner Heath then asked what, specifically, the department was concerned about. Dr. Cooke responded that it was an ethical as well as biological issue involving the establishment and replacement of artificially high numbers of deer. Commissioner Ryan asked if the department received applications year after year from the same landowners. Dr. Cooke replied in the affirmative. Commissioner Ryan then asked what sort of reduction could be accomplished were the department to interpret management plans more stringently. Dr. Cooke replied that staff was presently employing that approach and had significantly reduced the number of questionable applications. Commissioner Ryan then asked if it was the case that, in effect, the department was simply administering the permit program in terms of its original intent. Dr. Cooke replied in the affirmative.

4. ACTION - Possession and Sale of Deer Antlers

Presenter - Dr. Jerry Cooke

Chairman recognized Dr. Jerry Cooke who presented background on this issue. He recommended the Commission adopt the proposed regulation. Commissioner Angelo moved Commission approve carrying the proposal to the full Commission and place it on the Consent Agenda. Commissioner Heath seconded. Chairman called for a vote. Motion passed unanimously.

5. ACTION - Threatened and Endangered Species Proclamation

Chairman Bass related that Item 5, Threatened and Endangered Species Proclamation has been pulled from the agenda pending further work.

6. BRIEFING - Exotic Shrimp Aquaculture

Presenters - Dr. Larry McKinney and Mike Ray

Chairman Bass recognized the presence of Dr. Robert McFarlane in the audience. He then recognized Dr. Larry McKinney, Senior Director for Aquatic Resources who introduced Mike Ray, Deputy Director, Coastal Fisheries Division. Dr. McKinney briefed the Committee on the status of agency actions regarding exotic shrimp aquaculture, shrimp disease monitoring, and compliance of aquaculture operators. Commissioner Angelo asked how serious the diseases Dr. McKinney mentioned in his presentation were. Dr. McKinney responded that they can be serious, especially in an aquaculture situation, but that the impacts on native shrimp are really unknown. Commissioner Ryan asked if shrimp die-offs have been observed. Dr. McKinney responded that they have not, except those related to hypoxia conditions near the Louisiana border. Dr. McKinney continued with his presentation, concluding that the agency has taken a balanced approach toward the use of exotic shrimp in aquaculture in Texas. Commissioner Burleson asked if native shrimp had been successfully used in aquaculture. Dr. McKinney responded they have not. Commissioner Burleson asked clarification regarding native diseases and native shrimp in and out of crowded situations. Dr. McKinney responded that diseases such as white spot appear during times of stress. Commissioner Burleson commented that there would not be new diseases introduced if native shrimp were used. Dr. McKinney responded that was true, especially if the natives had no natural immunity to the disease. Chairman Bass mentioned the counter argument was that native aquaculture could be a hotbed of disease which might increase the incidence of that disease in the wild. Dr. McKinney responded in the positive, and related that expert virologists were primarily concerned about serious local impact rather than general spread of disease. Commissioner Burleson asked if the recent flooding had impacted the shrimp farms. Dr. McKinney said that they did not. Mr. Ray also responded that there was some overflow of ponds, but these presented no negative effects. Commissioner Angelo asked if this industry was still growing. Mr. Ray responded that the number of farms has remained steady since 1995. Dr. McKinney related that Texas is the largest shrimp farming state among South Carolina, Texas, and Florida. Chairman Bass asked if these operations were profitable. Dr. McKinney responded that they generally get one profitable year out of three. Chairman Bass asked for further questions? There were none.

7. BRIEFING - Shrimp Management and Sea Turtle Conservation

Presenters - Hal Osburn, Larry McKinney

Chairman Bass recognized Dr. Larry McKinney, Senior Director for Aquatic Resources and Mr. Hal Osburn Director Coastal Fisheries Division. Mr. Osburn presented information relating to the background and current status of shrimp management and sea turtle conservation in Texas and the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. McKinney ended with a recognition of Mr. Osburn and his staff for the good work they have done in maintaining a good conservation direction and a willingness to work with industry. Chairman Bass thanked Mr. Osburn and concluded the Regulations Committee meeting at 4:45 PM.


Committee Agenda Item No. 1
Presenter: Andrew Sansom

Regulations Committee
Briefing
Chairman's Charges
January 1999

(This item will be an oral presentation.)


Committee Agenda Item No. 2
Presenter: Larry McKinney

Regulations Committee
Action
Joint Commission Workshop
(TPWD, TNRCC, and TWDB)
January 1999

A. Update on S.B. 1

B. Legislative Issues


Committee Agenda Item No. 3
Presenters: Gary Graham, Phil Durocher, Hal Osburn

Regulations Committee
Briefing
1999-2000 Statewide Hunting and Fishing Proclamation
January 1999

I. DISCUSSION: Responsibility for establishing seasons, bag limits, and means and methods for taking wildlife resources is delegated to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission under Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 61. Proposed changes to the Statewide Hunting and Fishing Proclamation are a result of recommendations advanced by staff and suggestions from the public. Changes advanced by staff are based upon scientific investigation and are required findings of fact. The proposed changes implement statutory mandates, increase recreational opportunity, simplify regulatory activity, promote enforcement, and provide for the sound biological management of the wildlife resources of the state.

II. RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends the Regulations Committee adopt the following motion:

"The Regulations Committee of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission authorizes staff to publish the proposed 1999-2000 Statewide Hunting and Fishing Proclamation, contained at Exhibit A, in the Texas Register for public comment."

Attachment - 1

Exhibit A - Proposed 1999-2000 Statewide Hunting and Fishing Proclamation


Committee Agenda Item No. 3
Exhibit A

Proposal Preamble

1. Introduction.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife proposes amendments to §§65.10, 65.11, 65.26, 65.42, 65.46, 65.64, and 65.72, concerning the Statewide Hunting and Fishing Proclamation.

The amendment to 65.10, concerning Possession of Wildlife Resources, makes clear the conditions under which a wildlife resource document is not required of a person in possession of a wildlife resource. The amendment to §65.11, concerning Lawful Means, modifies the provisions of paragraph (1)(B) to reflect the fact that muzzleloader-only seasons now apply to spike-bucks as well as antlerless deer. The amendment to §65.26, concerning Managed Lands Deer Permits, specifies that the provisions of muzzleloader-only seasons do not apply on properties qualifying for an extended season and enhanced bag limit. The amendment to §65.42, concerning Deer, eliminates ‘doe days’ in Archer, Baylor, Clay, Montague, and Wise counties and expands the number of ‘doe days’ in the counties listed in paragraph (4)(C). The amendment to §65.46, concerning Squirrel, creates a youth-only open season in certain counties. The amendment to §65.64, concerning Turkey, opens new seasons for Eastern turkey in six additional counties. The amendment to §65.72, concerning Fish: establishes a prohibition on the underwater use of hand-operated devices to take fish; modifies the statewide walleye regulations to allow two walleye of less than 16 inches in the daily bag limit; reduces the minimum length for largemouth bass from 16 to 14 inches on Lakes Brownwood, Champion Creek, and Coleman; removes the 14-18 inch length limit on Lakes Bridgeport, Georgetown, Striker, Tyler State Park, and Weatherford, which places these lakes under the statewide 14-inch minimum length and 5-fish daily bag limit; imposes a 12-inch minimum length limit for blue catfish and a 25-fish daily bag limit for blue and channel catfish on Fort Phantom Hill and E.V. Spence Reservoirs; creates a 14-21 inch slot limit for largemouth bass on Lake Murvaul while allowing one fish per day over 21 inches to be retained; changes the minimum allowable length limit for temporarily weighing and retaining largemouth bass on Purtis Creek State Park Lake and all water bodies within the boundaries of Purtis Creek State Park, Gibbons Creek Reservoir and all waters within Texas Municipal Power Agency property, and Lake Raven to 21 inches; restricts baitfish use in Brewster, Crane, Crockett, Culberson, Ector, El Paso, Jeff Davis, Hudspeth, Loving, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, Upton, Val Verde, Ward, and Winkler counties to common carp, fathead minnows, gizzard and threadfin shad, sunfish (Lepomis), goldfish, and golden shiners; and conforms regulations for king mackerel and red snapper with proposed regulations for federal waters.

2. Fiscal Note.

Robert Macdonald, Wildlife Division regulations coordinator, has determined that for each of the first five years that the proposed rules are in effect, there will be no additional fiscal implications to state or local governments as a result of enforcing or administering the proposed rules.

3. Public Benefit - Cost Note.

Mr. Macdonald also has determined that for each of the first five years the amendments and as proposed are in effect:

(A) The public benefit anticipated as a result of enforcing the rules as proposed will be the dispensation of the agency’s statutory duty to protect and conserve the wildlife resources of this state, the duty to equitably distribute opportunity for the enjoyment of those resources among the citizens, and the execution of the commission’s policy to maximize recreational opportunity within the precepts of sound biological management practices.

(B) There will be no effect on small businesses. There are no additional economic costs to persons required to comply with the rules as proposed.

(C) The department has not filed a local impact statement with the Texas Workforce Commission as required by Government Code, §2001.022, as this agency has determined that the rules as proposed will not impact local economies.

(D) The department has determined that there will not be a taking of private real property, as defined by Government Code, Chapter 2007, as a result of the proposed rules.

4. Request for Public Comment.

Comments on the proposed rules may be submitted to Robert Macdonald (Wildlife (512) 389-4775), Ken Kurzawski (Inland Fisheries 389-4591), Paul Hammerschmidt (Coastal Fisheries 389-4650), David Sinclair (Wildlife Enforcement 389-4854), or Dennis Johnston (Fisheries Enforcement 389-4628), Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744; (512) 389-4775 or 1-800-792-1112.

5. Statutory Authority.

The amendments are proposed under the authority of Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 61, Uniform Wildlife Regulatory Act (Wildlife Conservation Act of 1983), and Chapter 67, which provide the Commission with authority to establish wildlife resource regulations for this state.

The amendments affect Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 61.

§65.10. Possession of Wildlife Resources.

(a)-(d) (No change.)

(e) A person in possession of a lawfully taken wildlife resource that is required to be tagged and for which there is no possession limit is not required to possess a WRD, provided the wildlife resource is properly tagged in accordance with this subchapter and Parks and Wildlife Code. [It is a defense to prosecution if the person receiving the wildlife resource does not exceed any possession limit or possess a wildlife resource or a part of a wildlife resource that is required to be tagged if the wildlife resource or part of the wildlife resource is tagged.]

§65.11. Lawful Means. It is unlawful to hunt any of the wildlife resources of this state except by the means authorized by this section and as provided in §65.19 of this title (relating to Hunting Deer with Dogs).

(1) Firearms.

(A) (No change.)

(B) Special muzzleloader-only [antlerless] deer seasons are restricted to muzzleloading firearms only.

(C)-(D) (No change.)

(2)-(5) (No change.)

§65.26. Managed Lands Deer (MLD) Permits.

(a)-(d) (No change.)

(e) On all tracts of land for which both MLD buck permits and MLD antlerless permits have been issued for the harvest of white-tailed deer, and on properties for which the WMP specifies a harvest quota of zero for either sex:

(1) (No change.)

(2) the provisions of §65.42(b)(7) of this title (relating to Archery-Only Open Season), §65.42(b)(8) of this title (relating to Muzzleloader-Only Open Season), and the stamp requirements of Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 43, Subchapter I, do not apply; and

(3) (No change.)

(f)-(g) (No change.)

This agency hereby certifies that rules as adopted have been reviewed by legal counsel and found to be a valid exercise of the agency's authority.

Issued in Austin, Texas, on

The amendments are proposed under Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 61, Uniform Wildlife Regulatory Act (Wildlife Conservation Act of 1983), which provides the Commission with authority to establish wildlife resource regulations for this state.

The amendments affect Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 61.

Seasons and Bag Limits-Hunting Provisions

§65.42. Deer.

(a) (No change.)

(b) White-tailed deer. The open seasons and annual bag limits for white-tailed deer shall be as follows.

(1)-(3) (No change.)

(4) No person may take or attempt to take more than one buck deer per license year from the counties, in the aggregate, listed within this paragraph, except as authorized under the provisions of §65.26 of this title (relating to Managed Land Deer Permits).

(A) In Archer, Baylor, Bell (west of Interstate 35), Bosque, Callahan, Clay, Comanche, Coryell, Eastland, Erath, Grayson (Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge only), Hamilton, Hood, Jack, Lampasas, McLennan, Montague, Palo Pinto, Parker, Shackelford, Somervell, Stephens, Taylor, Throckmorton, Williamson (west of Interstate 35), Wise, and Young counties, there is a general open season.

(i) Open season: first Saturday in November through the first Sunday in January.

(ii) Bag limit: three deer, no more than one buck and no more than two antlerless.

(B) (No change.)

(C) In Armstrong, Borden, Briscoe, Carson, Childress, Collingsworth, Cottle, Crosby, Dickens, Donley, Fisher, Floyd, Foard, Garza, Gray, Hall, Hansford, Hardeman, Haskell, Hemphill, Hutchinson, Jones, Kent, King, Knox, Lipscomb, Motley, Ochiltree, Randall, Roberts, Scurry, Stonewall, Swisher, Wheeler, Wichita, and Wilbarger counties, there is a general open season.

(i) Open season: first Saturday in November through the first Sunday in January.

(ii) Bag limit: three deer, no more than one buck and no more than two antlerless.

(iii) During the first 16 [six] days of the general season, antlerless deer may be taken without antlerless deer permits unless MLD permits have been issued for the tract of land. After the first 16 [six] days, antlerless deer may be taken only by MLD antlerless permits.

(D) In [Archer, Baylor, Clay,] Cooke, Denton, Hill, Johnson, and [Montague,] Tarrant[, and Wise] counties, there is a general open season.

(i) Open season: first Saturday in November through the first Sunday in January.

(ii) Bag limit: three deer, no more than one buck and no more than two antlerless.

(iii) During the first nine days of the general season, antlerless deer may be taken without antlerless deer permits unless MLD permits have been issued for the tract of land. After the first nine days, antlerless deer may be taken only by MLD antlerless permits.

(E)-(H) (No change.)

(5)-(9) (No change.)

(c) (No change.)

§65.46. Squirrel: Open Seasons, Bag, and Possession Limits.

(a) (No change.)

(b) In Anderson, Angelina, Bowie, Camp, Cass, Chambers, Cherokee, Delta, Fannin, Franklin, Freestone, Galveston, Gregg, Hardin, Harris, Harrison, Henderson, Hopkins, Houston, Hunt, Jasper, Jefferson, Lamar, Leon, Liberty, Limestone, Marion, Montgomery, Morris, Nacogdoches, Navarro, Newton, Orange, Panola, Polk, Rains, Red River, Robertson, Rusk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, Shelby, Smith, Titus, Trinity, Tyler, Upshur, Van Zandt, Walker, and Wood counties, there is a general open season for squirrel.

(1) Open season: May 1 - May 31 and October 1 through the first Sunday in February.

(2) Daily bag limit: 10 squirrels.

(3) Possession limit: 20 squirrels.

(c)-(d) (No change.)

(e) In the counties listed in subsection (b) of this section, there shall be a special youth-only general hunting season during which only licensed hunters 16 years of age or younger may hunt.

(1) open season: the Saturday and Sunday immediately preceding October 1.

(2) bag and possession limits: as specified in subsection (b) of this section.

§65.64. Turkey.

(a)-(b) (No change.)

(c) Eastern turkey. The open seasons and bag limits for Eastern turkey shall be as follows. In Angelina, Bowie, Cass, Cherokee, Delta, Fannin, Grayson, Gregg, Harrison, Hopkins, Jasper, Lamar, Marion, Nacogdoches, Newton, Polk, Red River, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, [and] Trinity, Tyler, and Walker counties there is a spring season.

(1) Open season: the Monday nearest April 14 for 14 consecutive days.

(2) Bag limit: one turkey, gobbler only.

(3) In the counties listed in this subsection:

(A) it is unlawful to hunt turkey by any means other than a shotgun;

(B) it is unlawful for any person to take or attempt to take turkeys by the aid of baiting, or on or over a baited area; and

(C) all turkeys harvested during the open season must be registered at designated check stations within 24 hours of the time of kill. Harvested turkeys may be field dressed but must otherwise remain intact.

(d) In all counties not listed in subsections (b) or (c) of this section, the season is closed for hunting turkey.

This agency hereby certifies that the proposal has been reviewed by legal counsel and found to be within the agency’s authority to adopt.

Issued in Austin, Texas on

The amendment is proposed under Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 61, Uniform Wildlife Regulatory Act (Wildlife Conservation Act of 1983), which provides the Commission with authority to establish wildlife resource regulations for this state.

The amendment affects Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 61.

§65.72. Fish.

(a) General rules.

(1)-(5) (No change.)

(6) In Brewster, Crane, Crockett, Culberson, Ector, El Paso, Jeff Davis, Hudspeth, Loving, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, Upton, Val Verde, Ward, and Winkler counties, the only fishes that may be used for bait are common carp, fathead minnows, gizzard and threadfin shad, sunfish (Lepomis), goldfish, and golden shiners.

(b) Bag, possession, and length limits.

(1) (No change.)

(2) There are no bag, possession, or length limits on game or non-game fish, except as provided in these rules.

(A) (No change.)

(B) Statewide daily bag and length limits shall be as follows:

Species Daily Bag Minimum Length (Inches) Maximum Length (Inches)
Amberjack, greater. 1 32 No limit
Bass: Largemouth, smallmouth, spotted and Guadalupe bass. 5
(in any combination)
   
Largemouth and Smallmouth bass.  

14

No limit
Spotted and Guadalupe bass.  

12

No limit
Bass, striped, its hybrids, and subspecies. 5
(in any combination)
18 No limit
Bass, white 25 10 No limit
Catfish: channel and blue catfish, their hybrids, and subspecies. 25
(in any combination)
12 No limit
Catfish, flathead. 5 18 No limit
Catfish, gafftopsail. No limit 14 No limit
Cobia. 2 37 No limit
Crappie: white and black crappie, their hybrids, and subspecies. 25
(in any combination)
10 No limit
Drum, black. 5 14 30
Drum, red. 3* 20 28*
*Special Regulation: During a license year, one red drum over the stated maximum length limit may be retained when affixed with a properly executed Red Drum Tag, a properly executed Exempt Red Drum Tag or with a properly executed Duplicate Exempt Red Drum Tag and one red drum over the stated maximum length limit may be retained when affixed with a properly executed Bonus Red Drum Tag. Any fish retained under authority of a Red Drum Tag, an Exempt Red Drum Tag, a Duplicate Exempt Red Drum Tag, or a Bonus Red Drum Tag may be retained in addition to the daily bag and possession limit as stated in this section.
Flounder: all species, their hybrids, and subspecies. 10* 14 No limit
*Special Regulation: The daily bag and possession limit for the holder of a valid Commercial Finfish Fisherman's license is 60 flounder, except on board a licensed commercial shrimp boat.
Jewfish. 0    

Mackerel, king.

2 27 No limit
Mackerel, Spanish. 7 14 No limit
Marlin, blue. No limit 114 No limit
Marlin, white. No limit 81 No limit
Mullet: all species, their hybrids, and subspecies. No limit No limit *
*Special regulation: During the period October through January, no mullet more than 12 inches in length may be taken from public waters or possessed on board a vessel.
Sailfish No limit 76 No limit
Saugeye 3 18 No limit
Seatrout, spotted. 10 15 No limit
Shark: all species, their hybrids, and subspecies. 5
(in any combination)
No limit No limit
Sheepshead. 5 12 No limit
Snapper, lane. No limit 8 No limit
Snapper, red. 4* 15 No limit
*Special Regulation: For the holder of a fishing guide license, the daily bag limit for red snapper is zero.
Snapper, vermilion. No limit 10 No limit
Snook. 1 24 28
Tarpon. 0 Catch and release only*.
*Special Regulation: One tarpon 80 inches in length or larger may be retained during a license year when affixed with a properly executed Tarpon Tag.
Trout: rainbow and brown trout, their hybrids, and subspecies. 5
(in any combination)
No limit No limit
Walleye. 5 16* No limit

*Special regulation: Two walleye of less than 16 inches may be retained per day.

(C) Exceptions to statewide daily bag, possession, and length limits shall be as follows:

(i) The following is a figure:

Location (County) Daily Bag Minimum Length (Inches) Special Regulation
Bass: largemouth, smallmouth, spotted and Guadalupe bass, their hybrids, and subspecies.

Lake Texoma (Cooke and Grayson)

5
(in any combination)

14

In all waters in the Lost Maples State Natural Area (Bandera)

0

No Limit

Catch and release only.

Bass: largemouth and smallmouth

Lake Toledo Bend (Newton, Sabine and Shelby).

8
(in any combination)

14

Possession Limit is 10.

Bass: largemouth.

Conroe (Montgomery and Walker), Fort Phantom Hill (Jones), Granbury (Hood), Lost Creek (Jack), and Ratcliff (Houston).

5

16

Lakes Fairfield (Freestone), San Augustine City (San Augustine), Calaveras (Bexar), O.H. Ivie (Coleman, Concho, and Runnels), Bright (Williamson), Cooper (Delta and Hopkins), Alan Henry (Garza), Aquilla (Hill), Bellwood (Smith), Casa Blanca (Webb), Old Mount Pleasant City (Titus), Rusk State Park (Cherokee), Welsh (Titus), Braunig (Bexar), Bryan (Brazos), and Gilmer (Upshur).

5

18

Nelson Park Lake (Taylor) and Buck Lake (Kimble).

0

No Limit

Catch and release and only.

Purtis Creek State Park Lake (Henderson and Van Zandt), Gibbons Creek Reservoir (Grimes), and Raven (Walker).

0

No Limit

Catch and release only except that any bass 21 inches or greater in length may be retained in a live well or other aerated holding device and immediately transported to the Purtis Creek or Huntsville State Park, or Gibbons Creek weigh stations. After weighing, the bass must be released immediately back into the lake or donated to the ShareLunker Program.

Lakes Pinkston (Shelby), Waxahachie (Ellis), Caddo (Marion and Harrison), Burke-Crenshaw (Harris), Grapevine (Denton and Tarrant), Davy Crockett (Fannin) , and Madisonville (Madison). 5 14-18 Inch Slot Limit It is unlawful to retain largemouth bass between 14 and 18 inches in length.
Lakes Bastrop (Bastrop), Houston County (Houston), Nacogdoches (Nacogdoches), Mill Creek (Van Zandt), Joe Pool (Dallas, Ellis, and Tarrant), Walter E. Long (Travis), Timpson (Shelby), and Athens (Henderson), and Murvaul (Panola). 5 14-21 Inch Slot Limit It is unlawful to retain largemouth bass between 14 and 21 inches in length. No more than 1 bass 21 inches or greater in length may be retained each day.
Lakes Fayette County (Fayette), Monticello (Titus), and Ray Roberts (Cooke, Denton, and Grayson). 5 14-24 Inch Slot Limit It is unlawful to retain largemouth bass between 14 and 24 inches in length. No more than 1 bass 24 inches or greater in length may be retained each day.
Lake Fork (Wood, Rains and Hopkins) 5 16-23 Inch Slot Limit It is unlawful to retain largemouth bass between 16 and 23 inches in length. No more than 1 bass 22 inches or greater in length may be retained each day. Beginning September 1, 2000, the upper limit of the slot will be 24 inches.
Bass: smallmouth.

Lakes O. H. Ivie (Coleman, Concho, and Runnels), Belton (Bell and Coryell), Cisco (Eastland), Greenbelt (Donley), Oak Creek (Coke), Stillhouse Hollow (Bell), White River (Crosby), Whitney (Bosque, Hill and Johnson), Alan Henry (Garza), and Devil’s River (Val Verde) from State Highway 163 bridge crossing near Juno downstream to Dolan Falls.

3

18

Lake Meredith (Hutchinson, Moore, and Potter).

3

12-15 Inch Slot Limit

It is unlawful to retain smallmouth bass between 12 and 15 inches in length.

Bass: spotted

Lake Alan Henry (Garza)

3

18

Lake Toledo Bend (Newton, Sabine and Shelby).

8

12

Possession Limit is 10.

Bass: striped, its hybrids, and subspecies.

Lake Toledo Bend (Newton, Sabine and Shelby).

5

No Limit

No more than 2 striped bass 30 inches or greater in length may be retained each day.

Lake Texoma (Cooke and Grayson). 10
(in any combination)
No Limit No more than 2 striped or hybrid striped bass 20 inches or greater in length may be retained each day. Striped or hybrid striped bass caught and placed on a stringer, in a live well or any other holding device become part of the daily bag limit and may not be released. Possession limit is 10.
Red River (Grayson) from Denison Dam downstream to and including Shawnee Creek (Grayson). 5

(in any combination)

No Limit Striped bass caught and placed on a stringer, in a live well or any other holding device become part of the daily bag limit and may not be released.
Trinity River (Polk and San Jacinto) from the Lake Livingston dam downstream to the F.M. Road 3278 bridge. 2

(in any combination)

18

Bass: striped and white bass, their hybrids, and subspecies.

Lake Pat Mayse (Lamar) and Lake O’the Pines (Camp, Marion, Morris, and Upshur) 25
(in any
combination)
10 No more than 5 striped, white, or hybrid striped bass 18 inches or greater in length may be retained each day.
Bass: white
Lakes Conroe, Livingston, Limestone, Palestine, Somerville, Buchanan, Canyon, Georgetown, Inks, Lyndon B. Johnson, Marble Falls, and Travis. 25 12

Lakes Texoma (Cooke and Grayson) and Toledo Bend (Newton, Sabine, and Shelby).

25 No Limit

Catfish: channel and blue catfish, their hybrids, and subspecies.

Lake Livingston (Polk, San Jacinto, Trinity, and Walker).

50
(in any combination)
12 Possession limit is 50. The holder of a commercial fishing license may not retain channel or blue catfish less than 14 inches in length.
Trinity River (Polk and San Jacinto) from the Lake Livingston dam downstream to the F.M. Road 3278 bridge. 10
(in any combination)
12 No more than 2 channel or blue catfish 24 inches or greater in length may be retained each day.
Lake Texoma (Cooke and Grayson). 15
(in any
combination)
12
Community fishing lakes, Bellwood (Smith), Dixieland (Cameron), and Tankersley (Titus). 5
(in any combination)
12
Catfish: flathead

Lake Texoma (Cooke and Grayson) and the Red River (Grayson) from Denison Dam to and including Shawnee Creek (Grayson).

5 20
Crappie: black and white crappie, their hybrids and subspecies.

Lake Toledo Bend (Newton, Sabine, and Shelby).

50
(in any combination)
10 Possession limit is 50. From December 1, through the last day in February, there is no minimum length limit. All crappie caught during this period must be retained.
Lake Fork (Wood, Rains, and Hopkins) and Lake O’The Pines (Camp, Harrison, Marion, Morris, and Upshur). 25
(in any combination)
10 From December 1, through the last day in February, there is no minimum length limit. All crappie caught during this period must be retained.
Lake Texoma (Cooke and Grayson). 37
(in any combination)
10 Possession limit is 50.
Drum, red.

Lakes Braunig and Calaveras (Bexar), Colorado City (Mitchell), Fairfield (Freestone), Nasworthy (Tom Green), and Tradinghouse Creek (McLennan).

3 20 No maximum length limit.
Shad: gizzard and threadfin shad.

The Trinity River below Lake Livingston between Polk and San Jacinto Counties.

500
(in any combination)
No Limit Possession Limit 1,000 in any combination.
Sunfish: Bluegill, redear, green, warmouth, and longear sunfish, their hybrids and subspecies.

Purtis Creek State Park Lake (Henderson and Van Zandt).

25
(in any combination)
7
Trout: Rainbow and brown trout, their hybrids, and subspecies.

Guadalupe River (Comal) from the second bridge crossing on the River Road upstream to the easternmost bridge crossing on F.M. Road 306.

1 18
Walleye.

Lake Texoma (Cooke and Grayson).

5 18

(ii) (No change.)

(c) Devices, means and methods.

(1)-(4) (No change.)

(5) Device Restrictions.

(A)-(H) (No change.)

(I) Pole and line.

(i) Game and non-game fish may be taken by pole and line. It is unlawful to take or attempt to take fish with one or more hooks attached to a line or artificial lure used in a manner to foul-hook a fish (snagging or jerking). A fish is foul-hooked when caught by a hook in an area other than the fish's mouth.

(ii) Game and nongame fish may be taken by pole and line. It is unlawful to take fish with a hand-operated device held underwater except that a spear gun and spear may be used to take nongame fish.

(iii) [(ii)] Game and non-game fish may be taken by pole and line, except that in the Guadalupe River in Comal County from the second bridge crossing on River Road upstream to the easternmost bridge crossing on F.M. Road 306, rainbow and brown trout may not be retained when taken by any method except artificial lures. Artificial lures cannot contain or have attached either whole or portions, living or dead, of organisms such as fish, crayfish, insects (grubs, larvae, or adults), or worms, or any other animal or vegetable material, or synthetic scented materials. This does not prohibit the use of artificial lures that contain components of hair or feathers. It is an offense to possess rainbow and brown trout while fishing with any other device in that part of the Guadalupe River defined in this paragraph.

(J)-(R) (No change.)

This agency hereby certifies that the proposal has been reviewed by legal counsel and found to be within the agency’s authority to adopt.


Committee Agenda Item No. 4
Presenter: Ken Kurzawski

Regulations Committee
Action
Crappie Harvest Regulations on Joe Pool Reservoir
January 1999

(This is Public Hearing Agenda Item No. 6.)


Committee Agenda Item No. 5
Presenter: Herb Kothmann

Regulations Committee
Briefing
Amendments to the Public Lands Proclamation
Proposed Hunting Activities on State Parks
January 1999

I. Discussion: Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 12, Subchapter A, provides that a tract of land purchased primarily for a purpose authorized by the code may be used for any authorized function of the Parks and Wildlife Department if the commission determines that multiple use is the best utilization of the land's resources. Additionally, Chapter 81, Subchapter E of the code provides the commission with the authority to establish open seasons, and authorizes the Executive Director to determine bag limits, means and methods, and conditions for the taking of wildlife resources on wildlife management and public hunting areas. Chapter 62, Subchapter D, provides authority to the Commission to prescribe seasons, number, size, kind, sex and the means and methods for the taking of any wildlife on state parks. Chapter 42, §42.0177, authorizes the Commission to modify or eliminate the tagging requirements of Chapter 42.

The Executive Director may establish by executive order the Department policy with respect to hunting, fishing, and non-consumptive use on public hunting lands. The proposed amendments to the Public Lands Proclamation are contained in Exhibit A. Exhibit B, Candidate State Parks for 1999-2000 Public Hunts, names the units of the state park system to be considered for public hunts during 1999-2000 season.

II. Recommendation: Staff recommends the Regulations Committee adopt the following motions:

"The Regulations Committee of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission authorizes staff to publish the proposed amendment to 31 TAC §65.192, concerning the Public Lands Proclamation, in the Texas Register for public comment."

"The Regulations Committee of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission authorizes staff to solicit public comment concerning the hunting activities proposed for units of the state park system contained in Exhibit B."

Attachments - 2

Exhibit A - Proposed Amendments to the Public Lands Proclamation
Exhibit B - Candidate State Parks for 1999-2000 Public Hunts


Committee Agenda Item No. 5
Exhibit A

Proposal Preamble

1. Introduction.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department proposes an amendment to §65.192, concerning the Public Lands Proclamation. The amendment to §65.192 authorizes the executive director to postpone hunts in response to natural disasters and other emergencies. The amendment is necessary to provide a mechanism for delaying hunts when circumstances make it impractical or dangerous to hold them at their scheduled times.

2. Fiscal Note.

Robert Macdonald, Wildlife Division regulations coordinator, has determined that for each of the first five years that the proposed rule is in effect, there will be no fiscal implications to state or local governments as a result of enforcing or administering the proposed amendment.

3. Public Benefit - Cost Note.

Mr. Macdonald also has determined that for each of the first five years the amendment as proposed is in effect:

(A) The public benefit anticipated as a result of enforcing the rule as proposed will be increased recreational opportunity for users of the public hunting system, and the preservation of recreational opportunity by rescheduling postponed hunts.

(B) There will be no effect on small businesses. There are no additional economic costs to persons required to comply with the rule as proposed.

(C) The department has not filed a local impact statement with the Texas Workforce Commission as required by Government Code, §2001.022, as this agency has determined that the rule as proposed will not impact local economies.

(D) The department has determined that there will not be a taking of private real property, as defined by Government Code, Chapter 2007, as a result of the proposed rule.

4. Request for Public Comments.

Comments on the proposed rule may be submitted to Herb Kothmann, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744; (512) 389-4770 or 1-800-792-1112.

5. Statutory Authority.

The amendment is proposed under Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 81, Subchapter E, which provides the Parks and Wildlife Commission with authority to establish an open season on wildlife management areas and public hunting lands and authorizes the executive director to regulate numbers, means, methods, and conditions for taking wildlife resources on wildlife management areas and public hunting lands; Chapter 12, Subchapter A, which provides that a tract of land purchased primarily for a purpose authorized by the code may be used for any authorized function of the department if the commission determines that multiple use is the best utilization of the land's resources; Chapter 62, Subchapter D, which provides authority, as sound biological management practices warrant, to prescribe seasons, number, size, kind, and sex and the means and method of taking any wildlife; and §42.0177, which authorizes the commission to modify or eliminate the tagging requirements of Chapter 42.

The amendments affect Parks and Wildlife Code, Chapter 81, Subchapter E; Chapter 12, Subchapter A; Chapter 62, Subchapter D; and Chapter 42.

§65.192. Powers of the Executive Director.

(a)-(e) (No change.)

(f) The executive director may close public hunting lands to public use to protect sensitive sites, and may cancel hunts or close the seasons on certain areas to avoid depletion of wildlife resources or in response to severe weather or other emergencies.

(g)-(j) (No change.)

This agency hereby certifies that the proposal has been reviewed by legal counsel and found to be within the agency’s authority to adopt.


Committee Agenda Item No. 5
Exhibit B

Candidate State Parks and Hunt Proposals for 1999-2000

PARK SPECIES/HUNT TYPE WEAPON TYPE PERMIT APPROXIMATE HUNT DATES CLOSURE
Arroyo Colorado NEW Deer YOUTH all legal means special Nov. 26-28, Dec. 28-30 N
Arroyo Colorado Feral Hog all legal means special Jan. 13-15, 21-23, 29-31 N
Atlanta Deer all legal means special Nov. 30-Dec. 2, Dec. 7-9, 14-16 Y
Big Bend Ranch Exotics all legal means special Oct. 5-7, 19-21, Jan. 4-6 partial
Big Bend Ranch Javelina all legal means special Nov. 16-18, Dec. 7-9, Jan. 11-13 partial
Big Bend Ranch Quail shotgun APH/OSR Nov. 9-11, Dec. 14-16, Jan. 25-27 partial
Brazos Bend Deer archery, shotgun, handgun special Nov. 2-4, 16-18, Dec. 7-9 Y
Brownwood Deer shotgun or muzzleloader special Jan. 4-6, 18-20 Y
Brownwood Deer shotgun or muzzleloader special Jan. 11-13, 25-27 Y
Bryan Beach Mourning Dove shotgun APH each day of South Zone season N
Bryan Beach Waterfowl: all species shotgun APH each day of the open seasons for those species. N
Caddo Lake SP/WMA all speices APH for all legal speies available on this area N
Caprock Canyons NEW Deer gun special Dec. 1-3 Y
Caprock Canyons Exotics all legal means special Dec. 8-10, Jan. 5-7, Jan. 12-14 Y
Choke Canyon - Calliham Unit Deer & Javelina all legal means special Jan. 3-5, 5-7, 10-12, 12-14 partial
Choke Canyon - N. Shore Unit Deer muzzleloader special Nov. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28 N
Colorado Bend Deer all legal means special Dec. 1-3, 8-10, 15-17 Y
Colorado Bend Deer all legal means special Jan. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28 Y
Colorado Bend Deer Youth all legal means special Dec. 29-31 Y
Colorado Bend Feral Hog archery special Aug. 14-16, 16-18, 21-23, 23-25 Y
Colorado Bend Turkey shotgun special Apr. 26-28, May 3-5 partial
Davis Mountains Javelina archery special Jan. 10-12, 12-14, 17-19, 19-21 partial
Devil's River Deer archery special Oct. 23-27 Y
Devil's River Deer all legal means special Dec. 4-6 Y
Devil's River Deer all legal means special Dec. 11-13 Y
Devil's Sinkhole Deer archery special Oct. 4-8 Y
Devil's Sinkhole Deer archery/muzzle special Jan. 10-12, 12-14 Y
Dinosaur Valley Deer muzzleloader special Jan. 10-12, 12-14 partial
Enchanted Rock Deer all legal means special Dec. 6-8, 8-10 Y
Enchanted Rock Deer all legal means special Dec. 29-31, Jan. 3-5, Jan. 5-7, Jan. 10-12, Jan. 12-14 Y
Enchanted Rock Deer Youth all legal means special Dec. 27-29 Y
Fairfield Lake Deer gun special Nov. 29-Dec. 1, Dec. 1-3 Y
Fort Boggy Deer archery special Oct. 15-17, Oct. 22-24 Y
Fort Boggy Deer all legal means special Dec. 7-9, 14-16 Y
Garner Deer all legal means special Dec. 7-9 N
Garner Deer all legal means special Dec. 13-15, 15-17 N
Guadalupe River Deer all legal means special Jan. 3-5, 10-12, 19-21 Y
Guadalupe River Deer all legal means special Jan. 5-7, 12-14 Y
Hill Country NEW Deer archery special Nov. 1-3 Y
Hill Country Deer gun special Jan. 3-5 Y
Hill Country Deer muzzleloader special Jan. 10-12 Y
Hill Country Deer gun special Nov. 8-10, 15-17, 29-Dec. 1, 6-8 Y
Honey Creek Deer all legal means special Jan. 3-5, 10-12 Y
Honey Creek Deer all legal means special Jan. 5-7, 12-14 Y
Honey Creek Deer Youth all legal means special Jan. 8-9, 15-16 Sat-Sun partial
Honey Creek Mourning Dove shotgun APH/OSR Sept. 4-5, 11-12, 18-19, 25-26 partial
Huntsville Deer all legal means special Dec. 29-31, Jan. 3-5, 5-7 Y
Huntsville NEW Deer Youth all legal means special Dec. 27-29 Y
Inks Lake/Longhorn Caverns Deer all legal means special Dec. 8-10 partial
Inks Lake/Longhorn Caverns Deer all legal means special Dec. 15-17, Jan. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21 partial
Inks Lake/Longhorn Caverns Deer Youth all legal means special Dec. 29-31 partial
Kickapoo Caverns Deer archery special Oct. 18-22, 25-29, Nov. 1-5 N
Kickapoo Caverns Deer all legal means special Nov. 8-10 N
Kickapoo Caverns Deer all legal means special Nov. 15-17 N
Kickapoo Caverns Deer Youth all legal means special Nov. 20-21 N
Lake Houston Deer all legal means special Jan. 10-12, 12-14 partial
Lake Houston Deer Youth all legal means special Jan. 8-9 partial
Lake Houston Squirrel & rabbit shotgun regular Dec. 13-17 (a.m. only hunts) Y
Lake Mineral Wells Deer all legal means special Dec. 28-30, Jan. 4-6, 11-13, 18-20 partial
Lake Somerville Deer muzzleloader special Dec. 14-16 partial
Lake Somerville Deer Youth all legal means special Dec. 20-21 Sat-Sun. partial
Lake Whitney Deer muzzleloader special Jan. 3-5, 5-7 Y
Lost Maples Deer muzzleloader special Jan. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21 Y
Martin Dies Jr. Squirrel Youth shotgun regular Dec. 11-12, 18-19 Sat- Sun partial
Matagorda Island SP/WMA Deer all legal means special Dec. 3-5 N
Matagorda Island SP/WMA Deer all legal means special Dec. 10-12, 17-19 N
Matagorda Island SP/WMA Feral Hog all legal means special Jan. 7-9, 14-16 N
Matagorda Island SP/WMA Waterfowl shotgun regular only on Sat. and Sun., a.m. only, during South Zone season for duck and Eastern Zone for Geese N
Mother Neff (prairie area ) Dove shotgun APH Sept. 1-3, 7-10, 13-17, 20-24, 27 - Oct. 1 partial
Pedernales Falls Annex Deer archery special Oct. 7-11, 21-25 Y
Pedernales Falls Annex Deer all legal means special Jan. 6-10, 20-24 Y
Pedernales Falls Annex Deer Youth all legal means special Nov. 25-28, Dec. 23-26 problems Y
Pedernales Falls Deer all legal means special Nov. 30-Dec. 2, Dec. 14-16 Y
Pedernales Falls Deer all legal means special Dec. 21-23, Jan. 4-6, 11-13, 18-20, 25-27 Y
Pedernales Falls Deer Youth all legal means special Dec. 28-31, Mon - Wed Y
Possum Kingdom Deer Youth all legal means special Dec. 20-21, 27-28, 29-30 partial
Resaca de la Palma Feral hog any legal means special Jan. 13-15, 21-23, 29-31 N
Resaca de la Palma White-winged dove shotgun APH-OSR each day of the white-winged season. N
Resaca de la Palma Mourning dove shotgun APH each day of the mourning dove season. N
Resaca de la Palma Quail shotgun APH each day of the quail season N
Resaca de la Palma Rabbits and Hares shotgun APH concurrent with dove and quail season N
San Angelo Deer all legal means special Dec. 3-5 N
San Angelo Deer all legal means special Nov. 12-14, 19-21 N
San Angelo Turkey shotgun special Apr. 7-9, 21-23 N
San Angelo Archery Deer/Archery Turkey archery APH/OSR Oct. 2-31 N
San Angelo Dove, Rabbit, Squirrel, Quail & Waterfowl shotgun APH/OSR Sept 1-30, Dec. 11- Feb. 29 on season dates open for each species on these dates. N
Sea Rim waterfowl all species shotgun regular concurrent with waterfowl dates during the open seasons for each species. N
Seminole Canyon Deer muzzleloader special Jan. 5-7, 12-14 Y
Seminole Canyon Deer muzzleloader special Jan. 3-5, 10-12 Y
Tony Houseman SP/WMA All legal species all legal means APH during seasons for Orange County N
Types of permits:          
Special permit - a $50 - $100 permit, valid for a 1 - 4 day period, issued to a limited number of people selected by drawing in advance.
Regular permit - a $10 daily permit issued at the hunt area the day of the hunt on a first come-first served basis.
Annual Public Hunting (APH) permit - the $40 permit allows participation in all scheduled hunts conducted under the APH permit; on-site registration (OSR) may be required.

Committee Agenda Item No. 6
Presenter: Dr. Jerry Cooke

Regulations Committee
Briefing
Status of Eastern Turkey Restoration Program
January 1999

I. Discussion: Wildlife Division staff will provide a brief history and status of the Eastern Wild Turkey Restoration Program and the future needs of wild turkeys in Texas. The presentation will include the current distribution of Eastern Wildlife Turkey in Texas, the reasons for the program's success, and some problems in Rio Grande Turkey populations that now should be addressed.


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