TPWD District Fisheries Office

5325 N. 3rd
Abilene, Texas 79603
(325) 692-0921
Michael Homer, Biologist

About the Area

Local Information

Nearby State Parks

 

Lake Cisco

Quick Links: Fishing Regulations | Angling Opportunities | Cover & Structure | Tips & Tactics


Lake Characteristics

Location: On Sandy Creek 55 miles east of Abilene and 5 miles north of Cisco
Surface area: 1,050 acres
Maximum depth: 70 feet
Impounded: 1923

Water Conditions

Current Lake Level
Conservation Pool Elevation: 1,520 ft. msl
Fluctuation: Moderate, sometimes prone to long periods with dropping water levels
Normal Clarity: Clear to slightly stained, visibility up to 6 feet

Reservoir Controlling Authority

City of Cisco
PO Box 110
Cisco, Texas 76437
(817) 442-2111

Aquatic Vegetation

None

Predominant Fish Species

Lake Records
Stocking History
Latest Survey Report

Lake Maps

A contour map is available. Download the map or pick up a copy at the Abilene fisheries office, (325) 692-0921.

Fishing Regulations

All species are currently managed under statewide regulations.

Angling Opportunities

Largemouth bass fishing is good to excellent for numbers of fish. Florida-strain largemouths were introduced 1991. Redear and redbreast sunfish are underutilized at Lake Cisco.

Species Poor Fair Good Excellent
Largemouth Bass     yes  
Catfish   yes    
Crappie   yes    
Sunfish     yes  
Fishing Cover/Structure

The steep-sided nature of Lake Cisco provides windy-weather fishing opportunities. Willow trees in the upper end of the north arm and the Sandy Creek arm line the creek channel. The reservoir is also loaded with dead flooded brush, boat docks, and rocky bluffs and points.

Tips & Tactics

This would be a great place to take children fishing for sunfish with minnows, nightcrawlers, or mealworms. Largemouth bass can be caught at the lower end around the large boulders and points or in the shallow, more off-colored, waters of the north arm or Sandy Creek. Fall bass fishing with buzzbaits can be heart-stopping. Spring fishing with worms or jigs flipped into willow trees, or hard and soft jerkbaits fished along the rocky and brush-covered coves, is hard to beat.


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