The Vegetation Types of Texas

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Physiognomic Regions


Grassland
Herbs (grasses, forbs, and grasslike plants) dominant; woody vegetation lacking or nearly so (generally 10 percent or less woody canopy coverage).
Shrub
Individual woody plants generally less than nine feet tall scattered throughout arid or semi-arid regions (less than 30 percent woody canopy coverage).
Brush
Woody plants mostly less than nine feet tall dominant and growing as closely spaced individuals, clusters or closed canopied stands (greater than 10 percent canopy cover).
Parks
Woody plants mostly equal to or greater than nine feet tall generally dominant and growing as clusters, or as scattered individuals within continuous grass or forbs (11 to 70 percent woody canopy cover overall).
Woods
Woody plants mostly nine to 30 feet tall with closed crowns or nearly so (71 to 100 percent canopy cover); midstory usually lacking.
Forest
Deciduous or evergreen trees dominant; mostly greater than 30 feet tall with closed crowns or nearly so (71 to 100 percent canopy cover); midstory generally apparent except in managed monoculture.
Young Forest
Various combinations and age classes of pine and hardwood regrowth resulting from the recent harvest of pine or mixed hardwood and pine forests.
Marsh
Emergent herbaceous plants dominant in inundated or periodically inundated areas; woody vegetation lacking or nearly so (generally 10 percent or less woody canopy coverage).
Swamp
Deciduous or evergreen trees with varying heights (canopy cover generally greater than 10 percent) within frequently or constantly inundated sites.
Crops
Includes cultivated cover crops or row crops used for the purpose of producing food and/or fiber for either man or domestic animals.
Barrier Island
Smooth sloping accumulations of sand, shell and gravel along sea and bay shores; periodically exposed unvegetated or sparsely vegetated wetlands and sand dunes.

Additional Information
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